HGTV's 'Rock the Block' filmed in town, contestants inspired by churches, Rainbow Row – Charleston Scene

A mix of clouds and sun. High 66F. Winds ENE at 5 to 10 mph..
Some clouds. Low 49F. Winds NE at 5 to 10 mph.
Updated: February 26, 2022 @ 7:41 am
“Rock the Block” Season 3 was filmed in the Nexton neighborhood in Berkeley County. Contestants, who are HGTV stars of other hit shows, are pictured (from left) Mike Jackson and Egypt Sherrod, Leslie Davis and Lyndsay Lamb, Evan Thomas and Keith Bynum, host Ty Pennington and Jenny and Dave Marrs. Tom Griscom/Big Table Media/HGTV/Provided 
As seen on HGTV’s “Rock the Block,” team Keith Bynum and Evan Thomas. Tom Griscom/Big Table Media/HGTV/Provided
On HGTV’s “Rock the Block,” teams work to transform their living rooms, giving them a coastal Carolina feel. Tom Griscom/Big Table Media/HGTV/Provided

“Rock the Block” Season 3 was filmed in the Nexton neighborhood in Berkeley County. Contestants, who are HGTV stars of other hit shows, are pictured (from left) Mike Jackson and Egypt Sherrod, Leslie Davis and Lyndsay Lamb, Evan Thomas and Keith Bynum, host Ty Pennington and Jenny and Dave Marrs. Tom Griscom/Big Table Media/HGTV/Provided 
SUMMERVILLE — HGTV home renovation stars flocked to the Lowcountry for six weeks toward the end of 2021 to film a new season of competition reality show “Rock the Block” that premieres Feb. 28. 
The show, hosted by Ty Pennington, took place in the Nexton community in Berkeley County, where four Summerville houses recently built by Hunter Quinn Homes were renovated and decorated by teams looking to win over a panel of judges for their interior and exterior design work. 
Teams were given a budget of $225,000 to transform each of their identical properties into an “ultimate oasis” that reflected not only their personal design aesthetic but also the Lowcountry.
“Some of these duos are far more competitive than we ever knew, and you won’t believe how they take inspiration from the grandeur of Charleston and put their own twist on it to make every space unforgettable,” said Betsy Ayala, HGTV senior vice president of programming and development.
Contestants include Mike Jackson and Egypt Sherrod of “Married to Real Estate,” Leslie Davis and Lyndsay Lamb of “Unsellable Houses,” Jenny and Dave Marrs of “Fixer to Fabulous,” and Evan Thomas and Keith Bynum of “Bargain Block.” 
New Kids on the Block band member-turned-renovation expert Jonathan Knight also made an appearance as a kitchen design judge during the first episode. 
“It’s going to be a blast to see these incredibly talented HGTV stars from all corners of the country — Seattle; Detroit; Bentonville, Ark.; and Atlanta — strap on their renovation tool belts and bring their unique skill sets to this competition table,” Pennington said. 
As seen on HGTV’s “Rock the Block,” team Keith Bynum and Evan Thomas. Tom Griscom/Big Table Media/HGTV/Provided
Bynum, a designer, and Thomas, a carpenter, were the couple featured from Detroit. On their HGTV show “Bargain Block,” they aim to “restore neighborhoods one house at a time” by buying abandoned properties and renovating them. 
It was the duo’s first time in the Charleston area, and while they spent most of their time working in the Nexton neighborhood, they resided downtown within walking distance of King Street restaurants, shops and nightlife. 
“I mean we worked a ton,” Thomas said, with partner Bynum citing a two-day stretch of 40,000 steps he took back to back. “We didn’t really get back to our house until like 9 at night usually, but thankfully restaurants are open late there.”
Among eateries the couple enjoyed during their month-and-a-half stay were Melfi’s, Husk and Little Jack’s Tavern, the latter of which they “drank their woes away at” some nights after rough critiques. 
“The competition aspect is tricky, because we’re not used to people critiquing our work,” Bynum said. “In Detroit, you know, we’re the toast of the city, so having our art and designs critiqued was a lot harder than I imagined.”
Thomas said the couple brought a little bit of their eclectic style from West Texas and Detroit to the competition, but as for the South Carolina vibes, they turned to some of the architecture they absorbed while walking around downtown. 
“We were really inspired by, in the downtown area of Charleston, the old churches that are sort of like Adobe in their exteriors,” Bynum said. “For the interior of the house, we kind of riffed off of that, and then the exterior was a little bit more like, I guess you’d say, what people normally think of from Charleston.” 
The exterior featured a “full pop of color that we love,” Thomas said, particularly inspired by Rainbow Row’s bold colors. 
“We want to do the host city justice,” he said. “But at the same time, we also want to do what we want to do. It was a fun challenge.” 
On HGTV’s “Rock the Block,” teams work to transform their living rooms, giving them a coastal Carolina feel. Tom Griscom/Big Table Media/HGTV/Provided
They also said they owed Croghan’s Jewel Box on King Street for offering up its window display that they saw while walking by on Halloween.
“They really saved one of our episodes,” Bynum said. 
While the contestants weren’t allowed inside each other’s houses during the process, Thomas and Bynum admitted they caught a few sneak peaks through the windows. 
They could see into the kitchen of Jackson and Sherrod’s house next door and peer from the third floor into the master bedroom and bathroom of Davis and Lamb’s home. 
“It was really fun to be that close,” Thomas said. “Everyone was working so hard and late that it became a little town there, like at night all the lights came on and the little (golf carts) were going back and forth. It was just a magical experience.” 
It was “kind of like going to summer camp,” he said. 
While the team couldn’t reveal the results of the competition, they did say contestants from the show are still good friends and hope to create crossovers with each other on their other HGTV shows down the road. 
The third season of “Rock the Block” premieres at 9 p.m. Feb. 28 on HGTV and Discovery+. 



Reach Kalyn Oyer at 843-371-4469. Follow her on Twitter @sound_wavves.
Kalyn Oyer is a Charleston native who covers arts & entertainment and food & bev for The Post and Courier. She’s a music festival & concert photographer and used to write about music for the Charleston City Paper, among other publications.

source

Leave a comment

Shopping cart

×